THE BASICS

RECOGNIZE
POISONOUS PLANTS

FOR YOUR HORSE

Horses do not have an unfailing sense of taste and its capacity to detect bitter substances is very variable from one horse to another. This is why it’s important to know the plants that may make him sick to avoid him from eating them. If horses are able to learn to avoid plants that make him sick however it only occurs if undesirable symptoms appear right after eating them. Over half an hour, the relation between the eaten plant and symptoms is not made. Thus, horses can’t learn to avoid a plant if the intoxication is chronic and appears due to the accumulation of toxins after a long-term consumption. Be careful ! Some plants can trigger a very fast and acute intoxication, like the English yew for example, of which a few grams can kill a horse.

Broad-leaved trees

Coniferous or resinous

Shrubs

Flower plants

PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR HORSE
WHILE ON A WALK

Watch its sweat

When performing an important effort, large veins on the surface swell, especially those on the neckline. This a natural reaction as blood cools better when veins are bulging. 

Pay attention to its
breathing

When resting, horses’ average breathing usually is between 15 and 17 cycles per minute, one cycle being one inhalation AND one exhalation. 

Unusual urine
and manure

If your horse doesn’t urinate like the other, its urine being brown or darker than usual, you should immediately warn your guide: it indicates that its urine contains blood from injured muscle fibre. 

Horse's harness

You should always check that your horse isn’t injured when brushing him, especially on the girth path and withers location. You shouldn’t ride him before its injury is treated. 

Check on its tendons

It is important to check that your horse’s tendons are not swollen. A persistent swallow is demonstrates that your horse is working too much or is having tendons issues. 

Keep him hydrated

Especially while on a long walk, your horse should be offered water at every opportunity.
A horse refusing water when others are drinking is not a good sign. 

International
equestrian
marking

Flèche orange, carré marron avec fer à cheval blanc
©AREF

Switzerland

White horseshoe on a green background to indicate equestrian routes. 
It can also be found with a white rider on a blue background.

©TREC GB

Great-Britain

Blue, purple or red arrows notify that the route is accessible to riders. 

Routes indicated with a yellow arrow are not accessible for riders. 

Balisage équestre (couleur orange)
©si photo

France

Equestrian route similar to the pedestrian's; but in orange. 

Géocheval is a tool helping you to ding equestrian routes as well as equestrian tourism centers that can host both riders and horses. 

Cavalier autorisé / cavalier interdit
©FN-DOKR/Gerlinde Hoffmann

Germany

There is no official marking in Germany trail marking is regulated differently by each Land. Existing signs differ if the route is private or public. 

Germany provides a webpage Pferdetourismus  that concentrates all information and offers linked to equestrian tourism in the country. 

©RFHE

Spain

Spanish equestrian marking indicates the name of the route, its accessibility and equestrian tourism infrastructures that are on the path : the website Turismo Ecuestre España collect all the useful services for riders.  

Equestrian marking is orange and very similar to the French :
- : route to follow ; x : wrong direction

©roadtrafficsigns

USA

Marking in the USA is white on a brown background. It indicates the direction to follow and shows the rider's position. 

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